Central African Republic Trade

Data in millions USD

Trade balance for the last 5 years – exports, imports, balance

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
export FOB 107,1 70,5 77 147,1 159,5
dovoz FOB 216,5 360,5 375,3 438,6 512,1
balance -109,4 -290 -298,3 -291,5 -352,6

Source: EIU

Territorial structure – position in (k) EU

Main import partners in 2017: France 17.1%, USA 12.3%, India 11.5%, China 8.2%, South Africa 7.4%, Japan 5.8%, Italy 5.1%, Cameroon 4.9%, Netherlands 4.6%.
Main export partners in 2017: France 31.2%, Burundi 16.2%, China 12.5%, Cameroon 9.6%, Austria 7.8%.
Main import partners in 2018: EU 28 42.8%, Cameroon 9.6%, Egypt 8.3%, China 7.4% and USA 5.4%.
Main export partners in 2018: EU 28 – 55.8%, Bangladesh 24.3%, China 7.4%, Benin 5.6% and Chad 2.6%.

  • Allcountrylist: Overview of major industries in Central African Republic, including mining, construction, transportation, tourism, and foreign trade.

Commodity structure

Exports are dominated by wood and diamonds (their export is now stopped), cotton, tobacco and coffee are also exported in small quantities. Mainly PHM, foodstuffs, textiles, all machines and means of transport, electrical appliances, products of the chemical industry, medicines are imported.

Free trade zones (VT parks, investment zones)

They do not exist in SAR for now.

Investments – foreign direct investments in the territory (sectoral and territorial structure)

Foreign direct investment virtually stopped in 2013, not exceeding US$1 million in 2013 and 2014, according to UNCTAD and the Heritage Foundation. It will take decades for investors to return to the country.

Investments – conditions for entry of foreign capital (restrictions, incentives for investors)

Note due to the current security, legal and financial crisis, we present it more for information. The high-risk environment will continue to discourage foreign investors and the inflow of foreign investment will be very limited. The World Bank evaluates the local business environment very critically – SAR took 187th place out of 189 countries evaluated. Practical obstacles are security (the government does not control a significant part of the territory), very poor infrastructure (electricity, water, PHM), high transport costs, a rigid and small labor market, illiteracy and a lack of qualified forces, a broken and dysfunctional judicial system that is unable to protect the investor, unenforceability of contractual obligations, excessive bureaucracy, corruption and lack of transparency.

On January 1, 1998, an agreement between the 15 African countries of the CFA currency area (and Guinea), called OHADA (Organisation pour l’Harmonisation du Droit des Affaires en Afrique), which promotes the development of the African Economic Community, a common trade policy and guarantees traders and investors legal certainty and compatibility.

The government formally declares a policy of open economy and free market. Property rights are protected by law (Charte des investissements), which guarantees protection to all subjects. According to the law, there is no difference between foreign and domestic subjects, but foreign nationals are the target of bullying. The Law on Investments (www.droit-afrique.com), distinguishes a preferential regime for companies investing more than 0.1 billion FCFA, companies investing 0.1 – 1 billion FCFA and large investors (investments higher than 1 billion FCFA). New investors can get various tax benefits depending on their inclusion in the privileged regime (zero corporate tax for up to 5 years ),they can import equipment and material duty-free for a certain period, they can depreciate faster and reduce the tax base for investments in employee education, research, infrastructure construction; companies operating in remote areas have additional concessions.

Foreign and domestic companies can establish and own a company, investors can sell, transfer the established company, they can repatriate income and profits. Article 10 allows for expropriation, but under the condition of adequate compensation. There are no conditions for investors regarding the need to make a profit, preferentially buy local goods, export a certain percentage of production or the need to invest in a certain area, time limit on foreign share or mandatory technology transfer. Investments in the oil, mining and logging industries are governed by special laws (Code minier, Code petrolier) and logging companies (Code forestier) www.droit-afrique.com. There are no special restrictions on transferring money to or from SAR.

The country’s relations with the EU

The EU is the most important funder in the SAR – within the 10th EDF (2009-2013), from which the SAR was able to draw a total of 138 million Euros (envelope A) and million Euros (envelope B). 10. In addition to direct budget support, the EDF was focused on good governance (stabilization of institutions), budget support and infrastructure construction. The EU also provides extensive humanitarian aid – 24 million Euros in September 2014. On April 1, 2014, the EU sent 700 men to the SAR as part of the EUFOR-RCA stabilization mission. The mission was supposed to end at the end of 2014, due to the delay in the preparation of the elections, it was extended until the middle of 2016. At the same time, a discussion was started on the transformation of this mission into a PSDC police mission. French influence still dominates the SAR, until mid-2016 approx. 2,000 French soldiers were stationed there as part of Operation Sangaris.

The European Union is one of the main international supporters and funders of SAR. The EU Transformation Mission (EUTM-SAR) operates in the country and President Touadéra conducts an active and regular dialogue with the Delegation of the European Union in Bangui and at the Brussels level. In July 2018, the EU pledged €20 million to reform the country’s security forces, logistics and infrastructure in Bangui.

At a conference in Brussels in November 2016, international donors pledged an unprecedented amount of €2.06 billion to support the Central African Republic, with the European Union providing €409 million under the 11th EDF between 2016 and 2020.

  • Representation of the EU in the country
  • The country’s trade relations with the EU
  • Provision of development funds and EU instruments

Representation of the EU in the country

Délégation de l’Union européenne au en République centrafricaine

Avenue Barthélémy BOGANDA, BP 1298 – Bangui (RCA)

Phone: +236 75.20.29.24

Email: [email protected]

Website: www.eeas.europa.eu

The country’s trade relations with the EU

EU countries imported EUR 12 million worth of goods from the SAR in 2017 and exported EUR 95 million worth of goods.
In 2018, EU countries imported EUR 14 million worth of goods from SAR, exported EUR 99 million worth of goods.

More information:

  • Trade EC Europe
  • MADB

Provision of development funds and EU instruments

The EU is the most important funder in the SAR – within the 10th EDF (2009-2013), from which the SAR was able to draw a total of 138 million Euros (envelope A) and million Euros (envelope B). 10. In addition to direct budget support, the EDF was focused on good governance (stabilization of institutions), budget support and infrastructure construction. The EU also provides extensive humanitarian aid. At a conference in Brussels in November 2016, international donors pledged an unprecedented amount of €2.06 billion to support the Central African Republic, with the European Union providing €409 million under the 11th EDF between 2016 and 2020.

More information: www.eeas.europa.eu.

Central African Republic Trade