Peace churches in Jawor and Swidnica

Tarnowskie Góry Historic Mine (World Heritage)

In the Upper Silesian mining region around Tarnowskie Gory, zinc and lead, and later also silver, have been mined since the 12th century. The system used to pump the water out of the mine is one of the technical masterpieces of the 19th century.

Tarnowskie Góry Historical Mine: Facts

Official title: Tarnowskie Góry lead-silver-zinc mine and its underground water management system
Cultural monument:
Continent: Europe
Country: Poland
Location: Tarnowskie Góry
Appointment: 2017

Wooden churches in the Carpathian Mountains (World Heritage)

From the 16th to the 19th century, a total of 16 wooden churches, the so-called Zerkwas, were built in the border area between Poland and the Ukraine. They were established by the fellowship of the Eastern Catholic and Orthodox Churches. The horizontal construction of the wooden elements of this cross-border World Heritage site is outstanding.

Wooden churches in the Carpathian Mountains: facts

Official title: Wooden churches in the Carpathian Mountains
Cultural monument: Transnational total of 16 wooden churches, the so-called Zerkwas, in southern Poland and western Ukraine from the 16th to 19th centuries; erected by communities of the Eastern Catholic and Greek Orthodox Churches in horizontal construction on the basis of a three-part floor plan with four- and eight-sided domes; Furnishings with wooden bell towers, icons, multi-colored decorations and adjoining cemeteries
Continent: Europe
Country: Poland, Ukraine
Location: eight places in southern Poland: Radruż, Chotyniec, Smolnik, Turzańsk, Powroźnik, Owczary, Kwiaton, Brunary; eight places in western Ukraine: Potylicz, Matkiv, Schowkwa, Drohobych, Rohatyn, Nyschnij Verbish, Yasinja, Ushok
Appointment: 2013
Meaning: exceptional evidence of a building tradition of the Orthodox clergy combined with local traditions; unique construction with a natural look

 

Wooden churches in the Carpathian Mountains (World Heritage)

From the 16th to the 19th century, a total of 16 wooden churches, the so-called Zerkwas, according to philosophynearby, were built in the border area between Poland and the Ukraine. They were established by the fellowship of the Eastern Catholic and Orthodox Churches. The horizontal construction of the wooden elements of this cross-border World Heritage site is outstanding.

Wooden churches in the Carpathian Mountains: facts

Official title: Wooden churches in the Carpathian Mountains
Cultural monument: Transnational total of 16 wooden churches, the so-called Zerkwas, in southern Poland and western Ukraine from the 16th to 19th centuries; erected by communities of the Eastern Catholic and Greek Orthodox Churches in horizontal construction on the basis of a three-part floor plan with four- and eight-sided domes; Furnishings with wooden bell towers, icons, multi-colored decorations and adjoining cemeteries
Continent: Europe
Country: Poland, Ukraine
Location: eight places in southern Poland: Radruż, Chotyniec, Smolnik, Turzańsk, Powroźnik, Owczary, Kwiaton, Brunary; eight places in western Ukraine: Potylicz, Matkiv, Schowkwa, Drohobych, Rohatyn, Nyschnij Verbish, Yasinja, Ushok
Appointment: 2013
Meaning: exceptional evidence of a building tradition of the Orthodox clergy combined with local traditions; unique construction with a natural look

Peace churches in Jawor and Swidnica (World Heritage)

The two baroque peace churches are considered to be the largest sacral half-timbered buildings in Europe. The Protestant church houses were built in the middle of the 17th century following the Peace of Westphalia. The Schweidnitz church can accommodate around 7500 people, the church in Jauer around 5500. Both have a rich interior with carvings and paintings.

Peace churches in Jawor and Swidnica: facts

Official title: Peace churches in Jawor (Jauer) and Swidnica (Schweidnitz)
Cultural monument: Peace churches based on plans by the Breslau fortress architect Albecht von Saebisch, built as a half-timbered building in the baroque style; Jawor (Jauer): built in 1654/55, three-aisled basilica, nave 44 m long, 24 m wide, 19 m high, 4 galleries on the north and south walls, decorated with numerous pictures and coats of arms of Silesian aristocrats, holds over 5,000 visitors, organ (1664); Swidnica / Schweidnitz: built in 1656/57, bell tower (1708), floor plan in the form of a Greek cross, two two-story galleries, interior with organ (1666), carved pulpit (1729) and high altar (1752), rich in epitaphs, guild coats of arms and pictures decorated, holds up to 7,500 believers; Third Peace Church in Glogau / Glogsw destroyed in the 18th century
Continent: Europe
Country: Poland
Location: Swidnica, Walbrzych Voivodeship; Jawor, Legnica Voivodeship
Appointment: 2001
Meaning: Masterpieces of baroque wooden architecture and also outstanding evidence of religious tolerance at the end of the Thirty Years’ War

Peace churches in Jawor and Swidnica: history

1241/42 Foundation of Jauer
1290 Schweidnitz capital of the principality of the same name
15./16. Century Economic heyday of the two cities
1526 Silesia goes to the Catholic Habsburgs
from approx. 1550 Lower Silesia becomes Protestant in the course of the Reformation movement
1555 Augsburg religious peace
1618-48 Thirty Years’ War
1629 Jauer and Schweidnitz are occupied by imperial troops
1648 Peace of Westphalia
1652 Approval for the construction of three Protestant churches in Glogau, Schweidnitz and Jauer by Emperor Ferdinand III., Granted subject to conditions (only outside the city wall, only made of wood and clay, church tower and bells initially prohibited, construction time within one year)

Peace churches in Jawor and Swidnica